Post surgery Physiotherapy

At Next Level Physiotherapy, John has years of experience rehabilitating sports people and non-sports people back to their chosen sport or work with full pain-free function after surgery. John has experience working in Orthopaedics with the NHS in Scotland, this, combined with John’s extensive experience in Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy, guarantees that you are in safe, competent and experienced hands. For more information on specific surgery rehabilitation, see our guidance below.

ACL (Anterior Cruciate Ligament) reconstruction:

The ACL is an extremely important ligament in the knee and prevents the tibia (shin bone) from moving forward on the femur (thigh bone). It is also responsible for sensory feedback to the joint during activities such as walking on uneven ground, walking down stairs, jumping, hopping and changing direction. The ACL needs to be surrounded by strong and stable muscles to reduce the risk of injury or re-injury. Therefore, it is essential that Physiotherapy after an ACL reconstruction or injury is received from someone who knows how to prescribe a comprehensive, evidenced-based and progressive rehabilitation programme that will ensure a successful recovery.

John has an excellent insight into the acute post-operative stage of rehab. In this stage, the knee would be swollen, painful to move and the patient may be walking with crutches for a couple of weeks, as guided by the consultant. In this early post-operative stage, going to a Physiotherapist that has experience in rehabilitating ACL reconstructions to full recovery will give the patient confidence and reassurance that they are in safe and experienced hands.

ACL rehabilitation is a long process that can last anywhere from 6-12 months and involves advice, education, reassurance, guidance, exercises, manual therapy as indicated and sports-specific exercises. Consultation with the orthopaedic surgeon is necessary to ensure that his/her post-operative protocol is carried out as requested, ensuring a speedy and successful recovery. Due to John’s experience working in the Orthopaedic and Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy departments in the NHS and private practice, he has seen successful and unsuccessful ACL reconstructions. Therefore, John not only knows when and how to progress an ACL reconstruction patient through the phases of rehab but also when they need a referral back to the consultant if progress is not as it should be.

An ACL reconstruction is a major surgery and patients should seek out an experienced, competent and confident Chartered and CORU regulated Physiotherapist that has experience in rehabilitating patients through the various stages of the rehabilitation process. Feel free to contact John at Next Level Physiotherapy for further advice or to book an assessment on our contact page here.

Rotator cuff repair:

Physiotherapy following a surgical rotator cuff repair operation is essential. The rotator cuff muscles are imperative in stabilising the shoulder and keeping it in position. The rotator cuff muscles are made up of four different muscles called the infraspinatus, supraspinatus, subscapularis and teres minor and they play a major role in stabilising the shoulder. If one of these muscles is impaired, it can significantly affect the power and function of the shoulder and cause a lot of pain and disruption to a person’s everyday life.

On completion of the operation, the consultant will create a protocol recommending the stages to progress the patient through to ensure a safe and successful recovery. This protocol would be shared to guide the Physiotherapist through the different stages of rehabilitation. It is essential that a patient with a post rotator cuff repair seeks out a Chartered and CORU regulated Physiotherapist as the advice, rehab and exercises issued in the early stages will set the tone for whether the patient has a speedy recovery or a slow and complicated one. For any further queries about Physiotherapy following a rotator cuff repair, shoulder surgery or if you would like to book an appointment, then please click here for details on how to reach Next Level Physiotherapy.

Spinal surgery:

There are several different types of spinal surgery that can be undertaken depending on the symptoms, age and lifestyle of the person in question. Your consultant will discuss all the options with you and decide on what the most appropriate type of surgery would be considering the aforementioned factors. Recent medical research has told us that surgery should always be the last resort, and most of the time, is no more successful than Physiotherapy alone. If all other types of treatment have been unsuccessful, then surgery may be beneficial to relieve some of the pain and symptoms.

Having spinal surgery can be a daunting concept so to ensure top quality care, it’s important to seek out a fully qualified and regulated Physiotherapist that is registered with CORU and the Chartered Society of Physiotherapists. Rehabilitating a patient post-spinal surgery may require liaising with the Orthopaedic consultant depending on his/her post-op guidelines, taking a full case history, discussing goals, fears, activity progression/management and how to overcome these issues. Treatment will focus on advice, education, reassurance, exercise prescription and manual therapy as indicated. For more information on Physiotherapy following spinal surgery or if you would like to book an appointment, please contact us here.

Total knee replacement:

A total knee replacement is usually undertaken when someone has severe osteoarthritis, which impacts on the person’s hobbies, daily activity, sleep and causes considerable pain. Having a total knee replacement is a routine procedure nowadays and patients can be discharged from hospital the following day. In the initial stages, the knee can be swollen and painful to move. Physiotherapy following a total knee replacement is extremely important in helping to regain full independence and mobility. The focus of rehab should be on strength, mobility, gait re-education, achieving full movement of the knee and increasing activity levels gradually. Manual therapy can also be useful in the early stages to assist with pain reduction and achieving full movement in the knee joint. A Chartered Physiotherapist is always best placed to rehabilitate a person post-total knee replacement, as they have extensive experience and knowledge in anatomy and managing patients after surgery. For further information about Physiotherapy following a total knee replacement or to book an appointment, please contact us here.

Total hip replacement:

A total hip replacement is normally undertaken when a person has severe osteoarthritis that is impacting on activities of daily life, sleep, work and hobbies. Having a hip replaced nowadays is a routine procedure and patients are normally discharged the next day. Following a total hip replacement, there are normally a few precautions that need to be adhered to for the first six weeks. These will be relayed to the patient from the Orthopaedic consultant or Physiotherapist in the hospital. In the beginning, it can be painful to move the hip and a person’s gait (walking) may be affected. Therefore, it is essential that a Physiotherapist with experience in Orthopaedic post-surgical rehabilitation, such as John at Next Level Physiotherapy, is sought out. The focus of rehab should be on strength, mobility, balance, gait re-education, achieving full movement of the hip and gradually increasing activity levels. Manual therapy can also be useful in the early stages to assist with pain reduction and speeding up the recovery process if indicated. A Chartered Physiotherapist is always best placed to rehabilitate a person post-total hip replacement. For further queries about Physiotherapy following a total hip replacement or to book an appointment, click here.

Ankle surgery:

The ankle is a complex and versatile joint and bears a high load through it, up to several times a person’s body weight when walking or jogging. There are numerous ankle surgeries that can be undertaken depending on what the symptoms are, and if all other conservative treatments have failed. The type of surgery selected will be discussed between the patient and the Orthopaedic consultant and an appropriate procedure will be selected, depending on the symptoms and goals of the patient. Regardless of the type of surgery, it essential that Physiotherapy is completed to ensure that full range of motion, strength, balance, neuromuscular control, proprioception and sport- or work-specific rehabilitation is carried out. It is essential that a patient seeks out a Chartered and CORU regulated Physiotherapist after ankle surgery to ensure that a high level of treatment is received from a competent and regulated health professional. If there are any post-operative protocols or guidelines to follow post-surgery a Chartered Physiotherapist is best placed to interpret these ensuring a safe and speedy recovery. For further information about Physiotherapy following ankle surgery or to book an appointment, then please click here for details on how to reach Next Level Physiotherapy.

Achillies Tendon Rupture

The Achilles tendon runs from the calcaneal (heel bone) up the back of the leg and joins with the gastrocnemius and soleus (calf muscles). When the Achilles tendon ruptures this means that there is a complete disconnection in the tendon fibres where it totally separates, and a palpable gap emerges. A suspected Achilles tendon rupture can be easily diagnosed by a Chartered Physiotherapist in the clinic by undertaking a physical examination. The Achilles tendon takes a load of approximately 4 times your body weight through it when walking and up to 8 times your body weight when running, hopping or jumping. Therefore, when the tendon ruptures there will be a notable loss of power when walking or taking part in any physical activity.

The normal treatment for a ruptured Achilles tendon would be conservative, meaning non-surgical, as most research studies show that surgical interventions are not any better than conservative and are obviously less invasive. With conservative treatment, as a rough guide, the patient would be put in a plaster of Paris for approximately 2 weeks, non-weight bearing with crutches, and then into an air cast boot for approximately 4-6 weeks. Heel raises would be inserted into the boot and would be taken out gradually over the next 4 weeks as per consultant post-operative protocol. The patient would gradually increase their weight to full weight bearing in the boot, to then weaning off the air cast boot entirely over the 6-week period, with the guidance of Chartered and CORU regulated Physiotherapist, who would be following the protocol as outlined by the patient’s Orthopaedic consultant. From this point onwards, a Chartered Physiotherapist will create a tailor made specific rehabilitation programme focused on getting the patient back to their work and hobbies in a safe and time efficient manner.

The post-operative protocol will vary depending on the type of intervention you receive. The Physiotherapist will liaise with the GP and orthopaedic consultant to ensure that the best possible treatment is received. Therefore, it is essential that a Chartered and CORU regulated Physiotherapist is sought such as at Next Level Physiotherapy ensuring that the patient is in safe, experienced and competent hands, guaranteeing an efficient and successful recovery. The estimated time frame for a full recovery following an Achilles tendon rupture would be 6-12 months, depending on age and the level of activity the person intends on going back to. For any further queries on Physiotherapy following Achilles tendon rupture please don’t hesitate to book an appointment with us here with Next Level Physiotherapy Cork.